Visual Artist, Sculptor

      Born in 1970, Kate Daudy is a British artist recognised for work exploring the limits of language and sculpture/text crossover. Known for her written interventions in public/private spaces expressing her search for meaning, she has redefined an ancient Chinese tradition as a contemporary art form for the modern era.   Driven by an insatiable curiosity about language and its creative potentials, her experiments have led her into collaborative dialogue with an array of artistic forms and disciplines.   The multi-dimensional works resulting from these interactions can be seen across Europe, America and the Middle East.      

Born in 1970, Kate Daudy is a British artist recognised for her work exploring the limits of language and for her sculpture/text crossovers. Known for her written interventions in public/private spaces Daudy works with poetry, expressing her search for meaning and drawing on the ancient Chinese tradition of inscribing poetry or words on objects, to produce a contemporary art form for the modern era. Multi- dimensional works resulting from her interactions can be seen across Europe, China, America and the Middle East. Collaborations have included, Rufus Wainwright, Bjork and Yann Toma. Driven by an insatiable curiosity about language and its creative potentials, her experiments have led her into collaborative dialogue with an array of artistic forms and disciplines. Kate studied Chinese at Oxford and speaks 7 languages. Her technique involves composing or carefully choosing poetry that reflects or contrasts with the nature of the object in question. The letters that form these poems are then cut from felt fabric and applied in differing techniques, depending on the object. Her most recent project has been the creation of a 500 hectare psychological landscape at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park in the UK, which will run until the end of June 2017. She has created installations, sculpture and performance pieces as well as written interventions on tree stumps, gates, stonewalls staircases and bus stops.

She is currently creating an intervention using a standard tent, 6m x 4m, issued and used in Zaatari, one of the biggest refugee camps in Jordan. She will embroider some of their words and thoughts on a tent which was given to her by UNHCR, the messages are collected from refugees in the Middle East and in the UK, the focus for her work is their sense of identity as refugees, their sense of loss and home. In her research she met with doctors, aid workers and nearly 500 refugees from Kosovo, Syria, Sudan, Somalia, Afghanistan, Palestine and other countries. The tent has been invited to the Reina Sofia Museum in Madrid and the National Gallery of Ontario for 2017/18. The aim is to raise awareness of the plight of refugees and the work of the UNHCR and other agencies.

In March she will write on buildings in New York with the support of the UNHCR to raise awareness for the plight of refugees.